09 November 2018: Conference presentation

I am delighted to have presented my paper, Memorializing WWI: Otto Dix’s Metropolis and the Reconfiguration of Militant Masculinity, at the conference Artistic Expressions and the Great War, at Hofstra University, New York, convened by Professor Sally Charnow, Department of History, Hofstra University. This interdisciplinary conference marks the 100th anniversary of the end of the Great War and aims to explore the impact of total war on the arts from a transnational perspective. This event has been rewarding in so many ways, thanks to the stellar work of Prof. Charnow and the rich contributions of everyone involved.

Presenting at Hofstra University, 9 November 2018.

At the German Studies Assocation Annual Conference, Pittsburgh, 27-30 September, 2018

It has been immensely stimulating to present my research on Otto Dix at the GSA’s annual conference, and share insights with talented researchers and make new connections. In addition to delivering a paper, I was delighted to act as commentator for the panel Weimar Representations of Women and Modernity on Sunday, 30 September.

Pittsburgh viewed from Duquesne Incline. Photograph copyright Ann Murray.

05 January 2018: New edited collection

Ann Murray, ed., Constructing the Memory of War in Visual Culture since 1914: The Eye on War (Routledge, 2018)

This collection offers a transnational, interdisciplinary approach to the impact of war on visual media from the outbreak of World War I to the present, examining a diverse range of visual material which reflect the heterogeneity of experiences and perspectives that have characterised artistic responses to war in the past century. It aims to contribute in a meaningful manner to the growing discourse on the memorialisation of war in art by exploring works that have resulted from an environment of war and across a broad range of twentieth century conflicts. With a foreword by Dr Laura Brandon, CM, PhD, Adjunct Professor, former Historian, Art and War, Canadian War Museum. The table of contents and introduction is here

Figure 1. Czesław (Czesiek) Mika, Mika Czesiek does not despair as he will die for his homeland, 4 January 1945.